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Silicon Ivy: How Cornell is prepping young entrepreneurs

FORBES: Cornell ranks fourth on FORBES' annual list of most entrepreneurial colleges. More

Cornell Engineering is presenting sponsor for MakerCon New York

Keynotes to include Intel CEO Brian Krzanich; KickStarter CEO Yancey Strickler; Massimo Banzi, Arduino Co-founder; and Tim McNulty, VP, Government Affairs, Carnegie Mellon. More

Girls explore Internet of Things in 2014 CURIE Academy

Girls in the 2014 CURIE Academy explored the Internet of Things by designing, building, and testing one of several simple devices inspired by real-world applications. More

Students teach high school girls shop, leadership skills

ME Today: Designing a lamp may seem like a simple enterprise, but for Cornell's ASME student section, it served as a way to enlighten high school girls about the exhilaration of being an engineer and empower them to see that they can be successful in the profession. More

Mike Todd Retirement Celebration

ORIE announces the retirement of Professor Michael J. Todd after 41 years of wonderful inspiration and service at Cornell University. More

CUAIR takes 2nd overall

CUAIR took first in Flight/Mission and second place overall at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s 12th annual Student Unmanned Aerial Systems competition June 18-22 at Patuxent River Naval Air Station in Maryland. More

Making MOOCs

Faculty members who created Cornell's inaugural MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) shared their experiences during a recent panel discussion. More

Damian Helbling

If you ask Damian Helbling, one of CEE’s newest faculty members, which books had the most significant impact on his academic interests, he’ll list three... More

Teams celebrate Robotics Week

Cornell's autonomous submarine and aircraft teams helped the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum celebrate National Robotics Week April 4 and 5. More

The next frontier in 3-D printing: Human organs

CNN: The emerging process of 3-D printing, which uses computer-created digital models to create real-world objects, has produced everything from toys to jewelry to food. More

David Mimno

Ever dreamed of having access to the information in the millions of books you’ll never have the time to read? David Mimno is your guy. As assistant professor of Information Sciences, he examines a question that’s not often answered--even in this Age of Information. More

Malte Jung

Most of us might not think that engineering and emotions go hand-in-hand. Malte Jung, however, believes there’s an important relationship between the two. As a professor of information science at Cornell, he studies how the efficiency of engineers and other teams are affected by interpersonal dynamics, and how technology can help or hinder these interactions. More

Christoph Studer

When Christoph Studer was young, he was obsessed with computer games. “Probably before I started reading, I was playing computer games,” he says. More

Ben Cosgrove

Ben Cosgrove wants to know how stem cells make critical decisions—to live, to divide, to die—and why these choices go awry as we age. He integrates new biological measurement techniques with analytical models to untangle how cells “compute” these decisions and uses this information to design better therapies to enhance tissue regeneration in the elderly. More

Engineering student Ray Li invents electronic musical instrument, the Aura

Ray Li, BS '14 and Michael Ndubuisi, BS '14, talk about their new musical instrument, Aura, which allows the musician to control sound simply by moving their hands in the air. More

Ludmilla Aristilde

The last time Ludmilla Aristilde was at Cornell, she was an undergrad--a fact that seems slightly surreal to her. “There’s still very much a part of me that is this little girl from Haiti,” says Aristilde. That little girl has since overcome chaos and strife in her homeland, traveled great distances, and fully embraced both the sciences and the arts--bringing her to the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, where she studies the biochemical interactions of natural toxins and man-made contaminants, and their effects on the environment--“the mechanisms of why it happens, and how it happens.” More

Ross Tate

Ross Tate is taking the road less traveled. As a professor of computer sciences, his research focuses on programming language design and formalization of industry languages. It’s a field that doesn’t get much academic attention, but Tate doesn’t mind being a trailblazer. “People told me I’d never made a career of it; it’s been done a lot and it’s subjective,” but Tate’s work is coveted by many computer language designers in the industry, which has opened doors to promising research opportunities. More

Roseanna N. Zia

Somewhere between the miniscule world of the atom and the one we experience as humans is another, “middle world”--larger than atoms but smaller than what the naked eye can see. Roseanna Zia, an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is at home in this world, studying the micro-mechanical underpinnings of macroscopic material behaviors in complex fluids and gels. More

Metastatic cancer cells implode on protein contact

By attaching a cancer-killer protein to white blood cells, Cornell biomedical engineers - led by Professor Michael King - have demonstrated the annihilation of metastasizing cancer cells traveling throughout the bloodstream. More

Saxena featured on BBC's 'Click'

Cornell researcher Ashutosh Saxena explains how he is teaching robots to be grocery clerks in a video for the BBC technology program. More

Jin Suntivich

What’s it like to move from Bangkok, Thailand, to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, as a teenager? Ask Jin Suntivich. “It’s interesting--you’re going from a city of few millions to a small of town of twenty thousand people. So, in some sense, the small population and the snowy winter in Ithaca is something I am very familiar with,” Suntivich says with a smile. Even the weather in North America hasn’t brought him down. After taking turns living in Chicago, Boston, and now Ithaca--places not exactly known for their temperate climates--Suntivich is sanguine. “I like it, I’ve picked up snowboarding,” he says. “Just like life, winter is as good as you can make it.” Suntivich’s sunny outlook extends to all facets of his life, particularly his research in oxide catalysis materials science, which he talks about with the enthusiasm of a true believer. “I did a lot of research as an undergrad, and that’s where I really fell in love with pushing the boundary of science.” More

C. Lindsay Anderson

Most people agree that the world must transition away from non-renewable energy sources, but exactly how to make that transition is a hefty problem. While some scientists work to improve the renewables themselves, perfected renewable resources still have to be eased into the infrastructure and economy that exists today--one that has been built around oil and coal for over a century. C. Lindsay Anderson, assistant professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, is up to tackling this problem using applied mathematics. More

Christopher Alabi

Some folks want to know what’s beneath the surface. Chris Alabi doesn’t want to discount the surface itself, however--at least, not yet. Alabi studies the surfaces of drug-delivering nanoparticles, with the aim of determining what surface properties correlate with specific biological targets. “If you understand what’s on the surface, then by default you can understand what proteins are attracted to the surface, and why it goes to which organs,” he says. More

Lena F. Kourkoutis

It’s been a long time since the iron curtain fell, but Lena Kourkoutis still remembers that moment when she and her family were allowed to cross over from East Berlin to the other side. A ten-year-old at the time, Kourkoutis mostly recalls the grandmotherly woman who gave her and her twin sister apples as welcoming gifts. Now, Kourkoutis is half a world away, breaking her own barriers in the field of electron microscopy at Cornell’s School of Applied and Engineering Physics, free to collaborate with whomever she wishes. More

John Thompson

John Thompson has seen a lot of the Earth--and knows a lot about what lies beneath it. Originally born in England, he has since lived in Canada, Australia, and the United States, and has worked in many other far-flung locations in search of the world’s mineral bounty. Now, he’s living in Ithaca, New York, where he’ll continue his work at Cornell, “understanding the geology of the earth through time, and why the earth concentrates commodities in certain areas,” as well as “trying to understand those processes to predict where we can find mineral resources.” More

Steve Jackson

Steven Jackson grew up in a remote steel town in Northern Ontario--a town full of teachers, doctors, and steelworkers. “I didn’t grow up around academics,” says Jackson. “I don't think I had any clear idea of what universities were or what went on there.” More

Nozomi Nishimura

Nozomi Nishimura finds the plaques that develop in the brains of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease “structurally beautiful.” But this aesthetic appreciation does not stop her from searching for a way to stop the progression of Alzheimer’s before it can really get started. More

Cornell University’s Fennie, Nirenberg named MacArthur Fellows

Craig Fennie, assistant professor of applied and engineering physics at Cornell University, and Sheila Nirenberg, associate professor of physiology and biophysics at Weill Cornell Medical College, are among this year’s 24 MacArthur Fellows More

Cornell Engineering moves up in U.S. News rankings

Cornell’s Undergraduate Engineering Programs came in at No. 7 among doctorate-granting engineering schools, up one spot from last year. More