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Spotlight

Malte Jung

Most of us might not think that engineering and emotions go hand-in-hand. Malte Jung, however, believes there’s an important relationship between the two. As a professor of information science at Cornell, he studies how the efficiency of engineers and other teams are affected by interpersonal dynamics, and how technology can help or hinder these interactions. More

Christoph Studer

When Christoph Studer was young, he was obsessed with computer games. “Probably before I started reading, I was playing computer games,” he says. More

Ben Cosgrove

Ben Cosgrove wants to know how stem cells make critical decisions—to live, to divide, to die—and why these choices go awry as we age. He integrates new biological measurement techniques with analytical models to untangle how cells “compute” these decisions and uses this information to design better therapies to enhance tissue regeneration in the elderly. More

Engineering student Ray Li invents electronic musical instrument, the Aura

Ray Li, BS '14 and Michael Ndubuisi, BS '14, talk about their new musical instrument, Aura, which allows the musician to control sound simply by moving their hands in the air. More

Ludmilla Aristilde

The last time Ludmilla Aristilde was at Cornell, she was an undergrad--a fact that seems slightly surreal to her. “There’s still very much a part of me that is this little girl from Haiti,” says Aristilde. That little girl has since overcome chaos and strife in her homeland, traveled great distances, and fully embraced both the sciences and the arts--bringing her to the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, where she studies the biochemical interactions of natural toxins and man-made contaminants, and their effects on the environment--“the mechanisms of why it happens, and how it happens.” More

Ross Tate

Ross Tate is taking the road less traveled. As a professor of computer sciences, his research focuses on programming language design and formalization of industry languages. It’s a field that doesn’t get much academic attention, but Tate doesn’t mind being a trailblazer. “People told me I’d never made a career of it; it’s been done a lot and it’s subjective,” but Tate’s work is coveted by many computer language designers in the industry, which has opened doors to promising research opportunities. More

Roseanna Zia

Somewhere between the miniscule world of the atom and the one we experience as humans is another, “middle world”--larger than atoms but smaller than what the naked eye can see. Roseanna Zia, an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is at home in this world, studying the micro-mechanical underpinnings of macroscopic material behaviors in complex fluids and gels. More

Metastatic cancer cells implode on protein contact

By attaching a cancer-killer protein to white blood cells, Cornell biomedical engineers - led by Professor Michael King - have demonstrated the annihilation of metastasizing cancer cells traveling throughout the bloodstream. More

Saxena featured on BBC's 'Click'

Cornell researcher Ashutosh Saxena explains how he is teaching robots to be grocery clerks in a video for the BBC technology program. More

Jin Suntivich

What’s it like to move from Bangkok, Thailand, to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, as a teenager? Ask Jin Suntivich. “It’s interesting--you’re going from a city of few millions to a small of town of twenty thousand people. So, in some sense, the small population and the snowy winter in Ithaca is something I am very familiar with,” Suntivich says with a smile. Even the weather in North America hasn’t brought him down. After taking turns living in Chicago, Boston, and now Ithaca--places not exactly known for their temperate climates--Suntivich is sanguine. “I like it, I’ve picked up snowboarding,” he says. “Just like life, winter is as good as you can make it.” Suntivich’s sunny outlook extends to all facets of his life, particularly his research in oxide catalysis materials science, which he talks about with the enthusiasm of a true believer. “I did a lot of research as an undergrad, and that’s where I really fell in love with pushing the boundary of science.” More