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Spotlight

C. Lindsay Anderson

Most people agree that the world must transition away from non-renewable energy sources, but exactly how to make that transition is a hefty problem. While some scientists work to improve the renewables themselves, perfected renewable resources still have to be eased into the infrastructure and economy that exists today--one that has been built around oil and coal for over a century. C. Lindsay Anderson, assistant professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, is up to tackling this problem using applied mathematics. More

Christopher Alabi

Some folks want to know what’s beneath the surface. Chris Alabi doesn’t want to discount the surface itself, however--at least, not yet. Alabi studies the surfaces of drug-delivering nanoparticles, with the aim of determining what surface properties correlate with specific biological targets. “If you understand what’s on the surface, then by default you can understand what proteins are attracted to the surface, and why it goes to which organs,” he says. More

Lena F. Kourkoutis

It’s been a long time since the iron curtain fell, but Lena Kourkoutis still remembers that moment when she and her family were allowed to cross over from East Berlin to the other side. A ten-year-old at the time, Kourkoutis mostly recalls the grandmotherly woman who gave her and her twin sister apples as welcoming gifts. Now, Kourkoutis is half a world away, breaking her own barriers in the field of electron microscopy at Cornell’s School of Applied and Engineering Physics, free to collaborate with whomever she wishes. More

Steve Jackson

Steven Jackson grew up in a remote steel town in Northern Ontario--a town full of teachers, doctors, and steelworkers. “I didn’t grow up around academics,” says Jackson. “I don't think I had any clear idea of what universities were or what went on there.” More

John Thompson

John Thompson has seen a lot of the Earth--and knows a lot about what lies beneath it. Originally born in England, he has since lived in Canada, Australia, and the United States, and has worked in many other far-flung locations in search of the world’s mineral bounty. Now, he’s living in Ithaca, New York, where he’ll continue his work at Cornell, “understanding the geology of the earth through time, and why the earth concentrates commodities in certain areas,” as well as “trying to understand those processes to predict where we can find mineral resources.” More

Nozomi Nishimura

Nozomi Nishimura finds the plaques that develop in the brains of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease “structurally beautiful.” But this aesthetic appreciation does not stop her from searching for a way to stop the progression of Alzheimer’s before it can really get started. More

Cornell University’s Fennie, Nirenberg named MacArthur Fellows

Craig Fennie, assistant professor of applied and engineering physics at Cornell University, and Sheila Nirenberg, associate professor of physiology and biophysics at Weill Cornell Medical College, are among this year’s 24 MacArthur Fellows More

Cornell Engineering moves up in U.S. News rankings

Cornell’s Undergraduate Engineering Programs came in at No. 7 among doctorate-granting engineering schools, up one spot from last year. More

Steven Adie

Steven Adie would like to bring his work in optical coherence tomography out of the lab and directly to the patient’s bedside. More

Patrick Reed

Patrick Reed has made a career out of managing water resources, an interest that began with a powerful event. While getting his degree in geological engineering at the University of Missouri, Reed’s hometown, St. Louis, was hit by the ‘93 flood of the Mississippi. “Pre-Katrina it was the largest natural disaster in U.S. history,” Reed says. “So I got to see my friends and family impacted by all of that...we saw homes float down the Mississippi.” More