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David Mimno

Ever dreamed of having access to the information in the millions of books you’ll never have the time to read? David Mimno is your guy. As assistant professor of Information Sciences, he examines a question that’s not often answered--even in this Age of Information. More

Malte Jung

Most of us might not think that engineering and emotions go hand-in-hand. Malte Jung, however, believes there’s an important relationship between the two. As a professor of information science at Cornell, he studies how the efficiency of engineers and other teams are affected by interpersonal dynamics, and how technology can help or hinder these interactions. More

Christoph Studer

When Christoph Studer was young, he was obsessed with computer games. “Probably before I started reading, I was playing computer games,” he says. More

Ben Cosgrove

Ben Cosgrove wants to know how stem cells make critical decisions—to live, to divide, to die—and why these choices go awry as we age. He integrates new biological measurement techniques with analytical models to untangle how cells “compute” these decisions and uses this information to design better therapies to enhance tissue regeneration in the elderly. More

Engineering student Ray Li invents electronic musical instrument, the Aura

Ray Li, BS '14 and Michael Ndubuisi, BS '14, talk about their new musical instrument, Aura, which allows the musician to control sound simply by moving their hands in the air. More

Ludmilla Aristilde

The last time Ludmilla Aristilde was at Cornell, she was an undergrad--a fact that seems slightly surreal to her. “There’s still very much a part of me that is this little girl from Haiti,” says Aristilde. That little girl has since overcome chaos and strife in her homeland, traveled great distances, and fully embraced both the sciences and the arts--bringing her to the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, where she studies the biochemical interactions of natural toxins and man-made contaminants, and their effects on the environment--“the mechanisms of why it happens, and how it happens.” More

Ross Tate

Ross Tate is taking the road less traveled. As a professor of computer sciences, his research focuses on programming language design and formalization of industry languages. It’s a field that doesn’t get much academic attention, but Tate doesn’t mind being a trailblazer. “People told me I’d never made a career of it; it’s been done a lot and it’s subjective,” but Tate’s work is coveted by many computer language designers in the industry, which has opened doors to promising research opportunities. More

Roseanna N. Zia

Somewhere between the miniscule world of the atom and the one we experience as humans is another, “middle world”--larger than atoms but smaller than what the naked eye can see. Roseanna Zia, an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is at home in this world, studying the micro-mechanical underpinnings of macroscopic material behaviors in complex fluids and gels. More

Metastatic cancer cells implode on protein contact

By attaching a cancer-killer protein to white blood cells, Cornell biomedical engineers - led by Professor Michael King - have demonstrated the annihilation of metastasizing cancer cells traveling throughout the bloodstream. More

Saxena featured on BBC's 'Click'

Cornell researcher Ashutosh Saxena explains how he is teaching robots to be grocery clerks in a video for the BBC technology program. More

Jin Suntivich

What’s it like to move from Bangkok, Thailand, to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, as a teenager? Ask Jin Suntivich. “It’s interesting--you’re going from a city of few millions to a small of town of twenty thousand people. So, in some sense, the small population and the snowy winter in Ithaca is something I am very familiar with,” Suntivich says with a smile. Even the weather in North America hasn’t brought him down. After taking turns living in Chicago, Boston, and now Ithaca--places not exactly known for their temperate climates--Suntivich is sanguine. “I like it, I’ve picked up snowboarding,” he says. “Just like life, winter is as good as you can make it.” Suntivich’s sunny outlook extends to all facets of his life, particularly his research in oxide catalysis materials science, which he talks about with the enthusiasm of a true believer. “I did a lot of research as an undergrad, and that’s where I really fell in love with pushing the boundary of science.” More

C. Lindsay Anderson

Most people agree that the world must transition away from non-renewable energy sources, but exactly how to make that transition is a hefty problem. While some scientists work to improve the renewables themselves, perfected renewable resources still have to be eased into the infrastructure and economy that exists today--one that has been built around oil and coal for over a century. C. Lindsay Anderson, assistant professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, is up to tackling this problem using applied mathematics. More

Christopher Alabi

Some folks want to know what’s beneath the surface. Chris Alabi doesn’t want to discount the surface itself, however--at least, not yet. Alabi studies the surfaces of drug-delivering nanoparticles, with the aim of determining what surface properties correlate with specific biological targets. “If you understand what’s on the surface, then by default you can understand what proteins are attracted to the surface, and why it goes to which organs,” he says. More

Lena F. Kourkoutis

It’s been a long time since the iron curtain fell, but Lena Kourkoutis still remembers that moment when she and her family were allowed to cross over from East Berlin to the other side. A ten-year-old at the time, Kourkoutis mostly recalls the grandmotherly woman who gave her and her twin sister apples as welcoming gifts. Now, Kourkoutis is half a world away, breaking her own barriers in the field of electron microscopy at Cornell’s School of Applied and Engineering Physics, free to collaborate with whomever she wishes. More

John Thompson

John Thompson has seen a lot of the Earth--and knows a lot about what lies beneath it. Originally born in England, he has since lived in Canada, Australia, and the United States, and has worked in many other far-flung locations in search of the world’s mineral bounty. Now, he’s living in Ithaca, New York, where he’ll continue his work at Cornell, “understanding the geology of the earth through time, and why the earth concentrates commodities in certain areas,” as well as “trying to understand those processes to predict where we can find mineral resources.” More

Steve Jackson

Steven Jackson grew up in a remote steel town in Northern Ontario--a town full of teachers, doctors, and steelworkers. “I didn’t grow up around academics,” says Jackson. “I don't think I had any clear idea of what universities were or what went on there.” More

Nozomi Nishimura

Nozomi Nishimura finds the plaques that develop in the brains of people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease “structurally beautiful.” But this aesthetic appreciation does not stop her from searching for a way to stop the progression of Alzheimer’s before it can really get started. More

Cornell University’s Fennie, Nirenberg named MacArthur Fellows

Craig Fennie, assistant professor of applied and engineering physics at Cornell University, and Sheila Nirenberg, associate professor of physiology and biophysics at Weill Cornell Medical College, are among this year’s 24 MacArthur Fellows More

Cornell Engineering moves up in U.S. News rankings

Cornell’s Undergraduate Engineering Programs came in at No. 7 among doctorate-granting engineering schools, up one spot from last year. More

Steven Adie

Steven Adie would like to bring his work in optical coherence tomography out of the lab and directly to the patient’s bedside. More

Patrick Reed

Patrick Reed has made a career out of managing water resources, an interest that began with a powerful event. While getting his degree in geological engineering at the University of Missouri, Reed’s hometown, St. Louis, was hit by the ‘93 flood of the Mississippi. “Pre-Katrina it was the largest natural disaster in U.S. history,” Reed says. “So I got to see my friends and family impacted by all of that...we saw homes float down the Mississippi.” More

Perrine Pepiot

Perrine Pepiot is interested in making fuel burn better. Fossil-fuel or renewably-sourced, Pepiot studies the molecular structures and chemical changes that happen when a liquid fuel is burned, with the end goal of making fossil fuels burn cleaner, and biofuels burn better. More

Krishnamurthy Iyer

Krishnamurthy Iyer researches dynamic markets, applying game theory to determine how these complex systems might behave under various conditions More

Ricardo Daziano

Ricardo Daziano would be the first to admit he fits the stereotype of the “artistic Italian” to some degree—he speaks multiple languages, enjoys oil painting—particularly in the style of the Italian Renaissance artists, and he is passionate about cooking. More

Florentina Bunea

Florentina Bunea wants to understand uncertainty. This philosophical curiosity is what brought her to her current field of work in statistics, unlike her more prosaic peers. More

Ankur Singh

Ankur Singh manipulates synthetic materials and living cells to improve human health. He traces his motivation to his experiences discussing problems with patients as a biomedical engineering student in India. “My ultimate goal is to take this research to the clinical level and benefit patients,” he says. More

Robert Shepherd

Robert Shepherd is creating functional materials that push the boundaries of robotics and 3-D printing. More

Abena Sackey Ojetayo

It's an engineer's dream: design Cornell Tech's campus in New York City with a green infrastructure that is a model of sustainability. Happily, it is Abena Sackey Ojetayo's current focus. More

Pierre Patie

To Pierre Patie, an associate professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering, quantitative research is all about the puzzles. More

Recruiting young women in STEM disciplines

On August 9th the College of Engineering is co-hosting with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences for an afternoon series of sessions for young women who are interested in pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. More

Olivier Desjardins

Understanding the physics of complex, turbulent multiphase flows fascinates Olivier Desjardins. His research helps improve both traditional fuel-engine systems as well as newer biofuel combustion systems by focusing, among other things, on unraveling the physics behind the atomization process—in which fuel turns to tiny droplets before being burned. More

David Matteson

Multivariate statistics involves the observation and analysis of many types of data at the same time, and how they relate to each other—a field that has fascinated David Matteson since he was young. More

Marten Wegkamp

Classic statistical analyses rely on large sample sizes of relatively simple data. However, in the world of biology, researchers are often faced with the reverse—small sample sizes of very complex data points, such as genes. Marten Wegkamp creates statistical models to help deal with these kinds of data sets. More

Andreea Minca

Andreea Minca is interested in risks and how they affect financial markets, a topic that is particularly timely given recent upheavals in the global economy. More

Julius Lucks

Custom-designing an organism to fit a researcher’s specifications sound like science fiction, but it’s something that Julius Lucks is working to make a reality. More

Gregory Fuchs

Greg Fuchs studies physics at the single-atom scale, experimenting with control over their individual quantum states. While the work is based in fundamental physics, the findings have real-world applications. More

Jan Lammerding

Jan Lammerding is busy redefining how we think of living cells. While traditional biology focuses on biochemical reactions as the main forces controlling cellular behavior, Lammerding looks at its mechanics. More

Tanzeem Choudhury

Tanzeem Choudhury likes to study humans. Throughout her career, she has used technology to study people’s behavior, psychology, and health—creating innovations that promise to enhance our daily lives. More

BOOM 2013 - Bits On Our Minds

BOOM is an annual showcase of student research and creativity in digital technology and applications. It's an opportunity for Cornell undergraduate and Master's -- level students to show their best work in cutting -- edge technologies, and past displays have included iPhone applications, video games, and robotics. More