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Spotlight

Welcome Francesco Monticone

If you want to realize a cloak that would be able to make something invisible, that is theoretically possible, at least for a single color More

Welcome Jayadev Acharya

You don’t want to ask SIRI a question and then have to wait a day for the perfect answer More

Welcome Vikram Krishnamurthy

The typical 18-year old spends up to six hours a day on social media. All those interactions have an effect. And we can use mathematical analytical tools to help explain some of the effects. More

Welcome Gennady Shvets

Shvets is excited to recruit new graduate students for is the creation of a new kind of endoscope More

Ope Oladipo '17: Bridging fields to create something new

Ope Oladipo’s (ECE B.S. ’17) interest in electronics started at a young age, but it wasn’t until he moved to New York City from Nigeria as a sophomore in high school that he really started working with Arduinos, microcontrollers, and other devices, which cemented his interest in electrical and computer engineering. More

Mikayla Diesch ’16, M.Eng ’17: Solving problems to make life better

As a high school sophomore, Mikayla Diesch and her younger sister competed in a competition to create an energy bar for NASA—and won. More

Hazal Yüksel: Pushing boundaries through curiosity

Hazal Yüksel is working to create a chip that aggregates multiple functionalities onto a single chip, making it smaller and cheaper, and potentially creating a paradigm shift in wireless communications. More

Welcome Immanuel Trummer

Before Trummer even had a computer, he wrote programs on paper and gave them to his friends to try out on their computers More

Welcome Rachit Agarwal

The kind of problems I tend to get excited about are the ones that force us to fundamentally rethink the basics— More

Welcome Greg Bewley

Bewley believes we don’t always pay enough attention to the things we can’t see More

Welcome Andrew Gordon Wilson

The more I learned, the more it seemed like AI and machine learning were quickly moving areas of mathematical research where one could make great contributions More

Welcome Madeleine Udell

“I look for similarities across industries so instead of addressing one problem at a time I can solve a whole category of problems.” More

Welcome Kirstin Petersen

When Kirstin Petersen was a high school student, she had the opportunity to spend some time at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena. More

Welcome Christina Delimitrou

Christina Delimitrou, assistant professor in Cornell’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), did not have a computer until she was 17. More

Welcome Nathan Kallus

Kallus has looked at how to make personalized diabetes management recommendations using electronic medical records More

Welcome Damek Davis

“Initially, I wanted to write code so I could spam people on MySpace with my music,” says Damek a bit sheepishly More

Welcome Fengqi You

“I believe that chemical engineers should be able to do everything,” says You. More

Welcome Itai Gurvich

“The national focus on healthcare has certainly presented me with some interesting opportunities for research,” says Gurvich. More

Welcome Jeffrey Varner

What Varner does “get” is how to use computer code to model biological processes More

Welcome Adrian Sampson

When I was twelve I started a software company More

Welcome Guillaume Lambert

“I remember thinking ‘this is so cool—I want to do this.’ I felt like a fish in water” says Lambert. More

Welcome Ilana Brito

Brito uses systems biology approaches to study the transmission of bacterial and genetic components of the human microbiome More

Welcome Nelly Andarawis-Puri

Andarawis-Puri’s work in tendon research is in the sweet spot where basic mechanics and clinical relevance overlap completely More

Welcome Matthew Reid

“I found I was adaptable when I spent two years teaching chemistry in Tanzania,” says Reid from his office in Cornell’s Hollister Hall. More

Christoph Studer: Doing things differently to improve wireless communications

The most exciting and interesting research problems come from working in multiple disciplines. More

Rick Johnson: Breaking rules to create a new field of study

Rick Johnson’s field of expertise did not exist until he helped created it. More

Joe Skovira: Embedding systems to make things work better

Integration is growing so much and processors are getting more complicated—students need to work with them to see what they can do. More

Shiva Rajagopal: Breaking rules to make life better

I want to be where I can have a direct effect on the world and make things that help the people around me. More

José Martínez: Breaking the rules to reimagine computer architecture

It’s critical to realize that disruption and incremental improvement are both absolutely necessary for progress, and that as a researcher one should be willing to embrace both. More