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Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Albert F. Zahm, (Engineering, M.E., 1892) an early aeronautical experimenter and a chief of the Aeronautical Division of the U.S. Library of Congress built America’s first significant wind tunnel and helped organize the first international conference on aeronautics in 1893.

David Duffield, (Electrical Engineering, B.S., 1962), the namesake for Duffield Hall, is the founder of two ultra-successful enterprise software companies: PeopleSoft and Workday. Dufffield’s foundation Maddie’s Fund has supported no-kill animal shelters, including Tompkins County SPCA.

In 1974, Prof. Jack Blakely and his MSE students were first in the world to synthesize a single layer of graphene (a very thin, nearly transparent sheet, one atom thick) and determine its structure. Their method is the same used today by industries to make meter-sized sheets of graphene.

Pearl Gertrude Sheldon’s (A.B., 1908, M.A. 1909, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ph.D., 1911) early research into shale fractures in the 1920s laid the groundwork for much of the North American shale gas exploration. Sheldon, a structural geology student spent several years afoot in the region around the Taughannock State Park and was a founding member of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca.

The first synchronous electric clock (Hammond Clock) was created in 1920 by Laurens Hammond (Mechanical Engineering, 1916). Hammond also convinced power station engineers to use a 60-cycle as a standard for electric current. This allowed his electric clock to keep time based on oscillations in AC current.