Undergraduate Students Reopening FAQs

Reactivating Campus for Spring Semester Instruction

Can I make an in-person appointment with an advisor (academic, career, faculty)?

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For the time being, all student advising meetings will continue to be via phone call or Zoom. 

Who do I talk to about my academic options for spring (e.g., remote coursework, affiliation, leave of absence)?

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Unaffiliated students should contact Engineering Advising. Affiliated students should contact their Undergraduate (Major) Coordinator.

Will Project Teams continue in the spring?

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Project Teams will continue in modified modes to ensure the health and safety of students.  More info coming soon.  Reach out to the Swanson Director of Student Project Teams with any questions.

Are undergraduates able to participate in research in spring semester?

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In-person and virtual research opportunities will be lab dependent and subject to University guidelines. Contact your lab supervisor for more information.

Will the ELI Undergraduate Research Grant Program be offered in spring?

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The Undergraduate Research Grant Program is expected to continue in spring. In-person and virtual research opportunities will be lab dependent and subject to University guidelines.

Will the limit on transfer credits be modified?

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At the moment, we do not expect any change to the College of Engineering’s policy of an 18 credit limit on transfer credit.

Is there a credit maximum policy for spring semester?

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Each undergraduate college has specific policies pertaining to permissible maximum credit hours per semester. The College of Engineering technically permits a maximum of 23 credits. Like fall, several features of the 2021 spring semester will be new to students and could introduce new sources of stress. We are strongly urging you to still limit your credits in the spring semester to 18 credits, and if you wish to take additional credits, we encourage you to first discuss your intentions with Engineering Advising, your faculty advisor, or your major department.

 
Please note: incoming first-year students will not be permitted to take over 23 credits in their first semester. Petitions to do so will be denied. For all other undergraduate students, in order to take over 23 credits, you must submit a Petition to Take a Credit Overload (More than 23 credits) form to the Engineering Registrar explaining the value of these additional credits. Such petitions will be granted sparingly and on a case-by-case basis.

Can I enroll in two or more classes that have a time conflict?

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A student may enroll in courses with overlaps with extenuating circumstances.
 
If there remains a critical or required class which conflicts with your schedule after you have pre-enrolled, submit a Time Conflict Permission Form, pending approval, this will allow the EN Registrar staff to override the time conflict and enroll you in the conflicting class. The EN Registrar’s office will begin accepting the Time Conflict Permission Form on Monday, February 1st. The student needs to enroll in one of the conflicting classes before submitting the completed form and the EN Registrar staff will enroll you in the conflicting class. Both department and faculty approval from each class are required on the form. Approval can be in the form of an email. Please send all paperwork (Time Conflict Permission Form, department and both faculty approval) to eng_registrar@cornell.edu.
 
Note that if a student is exceeding the college 23 credit cap the student would also need to complete a petition form along with the add/drop form obtaining the necessary approvals on both forms.

Will Engineering publish a Dean’s List in spring 2021?

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Yes, but students participating in Study Away should note that courses taken at other institutions, including a Study Away host institution, are not included in the calculation for Dean’s List.

In one of my classes the prelim and/or semi-final exam will be given in person and remotely. I am worried about how this will work and if I will be at a disadvantage if I take the exam in-person.

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We expect all members of the Cornell community to uphold academic integrity. Most instructors are aware of student concerns regarding academic integrity for in-person vs. remote quizzes and examinations.  Each instructor has discretion to determine how best to address these concerns. The instructor may, for example, scramble the questions so that there are many versions of an exam, provide a narrow time window for the on-line exam to occur, or not grade on a curve so you are not penalized by another student’s poor choice to cheat. Some faculty may use alternate means to assess student learning for remote students, for example, a short oral exam. These are all imperfect solutions to a difficult situation for everyone. Note that cites such as Chegg can and do cooperate with university investigations of academic integrity violations and in many cases instructors and TAs can discern who copied solutions. If you do have concerns please raise them for discussion with your instructor and TAs.