Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

John Sweet, one of the first professors to ever teach engineering courses at Cornell, in 1873 built the first micrometer caliper for making tools in the United States. He also invented a nail-making machine that made the hand production of nails obsolete.

In 2000, Prof. Christopher Ober created Alpha-Terp, a thermoset epoxy used to hold computer components together. It melts at high temperatures, allowing components to be sorted and recycled when the computer’s life is over and has saved millions of computers from the landfill.

Howard W. Riley (Electrical Engineering, M.S., 1901) created a new design for concrete septic tanks for farms in 1920. This invention greatly improved sanitation and overall health for many rural families. Riley-Robb Hall, where the department now resides, is named after him.

In 2014, Prof. Lynden Archer in 2014 was recognized for his outstanding contributions to the advancement of nanoscale science for his pioneering and sustained research on nanoparticle-polymer hybrid materials and their applications in electrochemical energy storage technologies.

In 1962, Lester Ford and faculty member, Ray Fulkerson, published Flows in Networks, a groundbreaking treatise culminating a decade-long research initiative that developed the algorithmic foundations for analyzing the capacity of networks to supply services. These algorithmic insights continue to be the driver of methods in use today.