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Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

William Jewell, professor emeritus in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, developed a nationally recognized initiative that employs animal manure in anarerobic digestion systems to produce electricity and heat on a farm.

UltrOZ, a wearable therapeutic ultrasound system for horses, provides up to six hours of unsupervised ultrasound therapy to reduce inflammation and promote healing. The technology grew out of work done by Cornell alum, George K. Lewis, (BME, M.S. 2008, Ph.D., 2012) who co-founded the company.

The Cornell Center for Technology, Enterprise, and Commercialization facilitates the commercial development and use of technological innovations created by Cornell researchers. In 2009, 77 U.S. patents were issued to Cornell innovators.

In 2011, Cornell University was designated by New York City to build a sustainable campus on Roosevelt Island for graduate tech education. Cornell Tech (created under Dean Lance R. Collins) is an innovative, sustainable academic campus made up of a combination of state of the art academic space, along with housing for faculty, students, and staff, and publicly accessible open space.

George Winter's (Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1940) research led to the first publication in 1946 of the American Iron and Steel Institute Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members. Most of the research and the writing of this code can be attributed to George Winter. It soon became the world-recognized standard for this type of construction and has been published abroad in many languages.