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Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Cornell College of Engineering was among the first engineering colleges to teach nanotechnology to undergrads through a hands-on course designing and building nanotech devices.

William Durand, a mechanical engineering professor from 1891 to 1904, was instrumental in forming the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1915, which was the forerunner of NASA. Durand helped to plan the committee’s first laboratory at Langley Field.

Prof. Jack Oliver's research provided convincing proof that Earth’s continents are constantly moving. In 1968, Dr. Oliver, colleague Dr. Bryan Isacks and a former graduate student Lynn Sykes, wrote the paper “Seismology and the New Global Tectonics,” that put together earthquake evidence from around the world that made a convincing case that continental drift was indeed occurring.

In 1975, OR students Edward Ignall and Warren Walker along with co-authors publish their paradigm-shifting paper, “Improving the Deployment of New York City Fire Companies”. Later awarded the INFORMS Lanchester Prize, it sets a new scope of directions for applications of OR in the public sector.

Salpeter-Decay-The technique for detecting radiologic decay in tagged molecules called quantitative electron-microscopic autoradiography was developed by Miriam Salpeter during her postdoctoral research in Applied and Engineering Physics in 1961 to 1967.