Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Rick Johnson, Cornell professor of engineering, who holds a Ph.D. in engineering with a Ph.D. minor in art history, developed a process that can help verify paintings based on the weave pattern of the canvas. In 2013, his technique helped authenticate a long-lost Vincent van Gogh painting “Sunset at Montmajour.”

James W. Spencer (Civil Engineering, B.S., 1949, M.S. 1951) became the first "official" leader of the Cornell Local Roads Program (CLPR). Established after WWII in 1923, the program provided comprehensive applied research and extension support to highway superintendents and under Spencer hosted “Highway School” for 70 years.

The name "Big Red Bear" originated in 1916, when the Cornell varsity football team collected $25 to buy a black bear cub, which they named Touchdown, to serve as a mascot. Cornell's varsity teams are actually nicknamed simply "the Big Red."

Chris Prince (Ph.D., 1991) and Bobby Bringi (Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., 1991), formed Phyton Biotech that pioneered and commercialized a breakthrough plant-cell fermentation technology to produce the anti-cancer drug, Taxol, first extracted from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree.

Charles Ward Hall (B.S., 1895) pioneered aluminum manufacturing procedures and tools in building aircraft. He developed the idea and tools to join duralumin – aircraft aluminum alloy skin – using cold-set rivets. This quickly revolutionized the manufacturing process and helped reduce drag.