Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been."—Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo and do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Jim S. Thorp (Ph.D., 1962; M.S., 1961; B.S., 1959, electrical engineering) co-invented the phasor measurement unit (PMU) for which he was elected to the National Association of Engineering and won the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering. These PMU units are now ubiquitous in utility systems worldwide and have played a key role in diminishing the frequency and impact of blackouts.

William Jewell, professor emeritus in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, developed a nationally recognized initiative that employs animal manure in anarerobic digestion systems to produce electricity and heat on a farm.

In 2006, Cornell's Global Positioning System Laboratory cracked the so-called pseudo random number (PRNs) codes of Europe's first global navigation satellite. This gave free access for consumers who use navigation devices -- including handheld receivers and systems installed in vehicles -- that need PRNs to listen to satellites.

John Sweet, one of the first professors to ever teach engineering courses at Cornell, in 1873 built the first micrometer caliper for making tools in the United States. He also invented a nail-making machine that made the hand production of nails obsolete.

S.C. Thomas Sze was one of the first Chinese students to graduate from Cornell in 1905 with a B.S. in mechanical engineering. He went on to become the driving force behind the building of China’s national railway system around 1909-1910.