Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Watt Webb, Professor of Applied Physics since 1965, and Malcolm Beasley (Applied and Engineering Physics, M.S., 1962; Physics, Ph.D., 1968) designed the first intrinsically stable superconducting magnet, which is still used today in magnetic resonance imaging. Watt W. Webb is known for his co-invention (with Winfried Denk and Jim Strickler) of Multiphoton microscopy in 1990.

In 2005, Prof. Larry Bonassar (BME)and Prof. Hod Lipson (MAE) developed the first bio-printing of living tissue and printed a meniscus which lived for three months in incubation. This launched the field of bio-printing.

The namesake of the Pew Engineering Quad, Joseph N. Pew, Jr. (Mechanical Engineering, B.S., 1908) and later Vice President of Sun Oil Company developed, in 1926, a gyroscopic instrument with a high-speed camera and timing device for preventing the drilling of crooked holes in oil wells. He also founded Pew Charitable Trusts in 1948-independent nonprofit committed to improving public policy, informing the public on issues and invigorating civic life by encouraging democratic participation and strong communities.

In 2013, late Prof. Ephrahim Garcia , and his graduate student Michael W. Shafer (Mechanical Engineering, M.S., 2012; Ph.D., 2013) invented a “bird backpack” weighing less than 12 grams. The devices are self-powered and provide a way to collect data from migrating birds without having to recharge batteries or weigh the bird down.

Bill Nye “The Science Guy” (Mechanical Engineering, B.S., 1977) popularized science for children (and their parents) with a PBS kids show from 1993-1998. Still enjoying widespread popularity today, Nye remains a staunch advocate for science education and appears frequently on television and radio programs.