Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been."—Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

In 2013, late Prof. Ephrahim Garcia , and his graduate student Michael W. Shafer (Mechanical Engineering, M.S., 2012; Ph.D., 2013) invented a “bird backpack” weighing less than 12 grams. The devices are self-powered and provide a way to collect data from migrating birds without having to recharge batteries or weigh the bird down.

Willis Carrier, a 1901 mechanical engineering grad, invented air conditioning in 1902. Three years later Madison Square Garden hosted the first pro hockey game to be played indoors on ice refrigerated by Carrier chillers.

Professor Marjolein van der Meulen was co-Prinicipal Investigator on the CU-ADVANCE which started in 2009. Cornell University is committed to diversity and gender equity and to an institutional environment where all faculty can achieve their greatest potential in research, education, and service.

Cornell was the first among all U.S. colleges and universities to allow undergraduates to borrow books from its libraries.

Edward Wyckoff, a Cornell Engineering student in 1889, drew plans for the first suspension bridge spanning Fall Creek gorge as a course project. He failed the project course, but came back tweny plus years later, and then Wyckoff, heir to the Remington typewriter fortune, financed the construction of his bridge over the gorge.