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Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Pearl Gertrude Sheldon’s (A.B., 1908, M.A. 1909, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Ph.D., 1911) early research into shale fractures in the 1920s laid the groundwork for much of the North American shale gas exploration. Sheldon, a structural geology student spent several years afoot in the region around the Taughannock State Park and was a founding member of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca.

A Cornell cancer research team, led by associate professor Cynthia Reinhart-King, invented a new approach to screening the most dangerous cancer cells by creating a microfluidic device that isolates only the most aggressive, metastatic cancer cells.

The electric elevator was invented in 1891 by Frederick Bedell (Physics, Ph.D., 1892) while he was still a grad student. His invention was an improvement over the hydraulic elevators that couldn’t reach the upper floors of New York City’s rising skyline. Bedell was later appointed to the Cornell faculty as an instructor and in 1904 had risen to the rank of full professor.

1967 – Dick Conway, Bill Maxwell (both Cornell faculty), and Miller publish their landmark text, Theory of Scheduling, which placed on a formal foundation the study of the entire area of production scheduling. In the decades that followed, the automatic scheduling of computers, transportation models, and eventually all aspects of industrial production are shaped by the directions outlined in this book.

John W. Wells (M.A., 1930, Ph.D., 1933), professor of geology from 1948-1973, discovered that corals can be used to determine past rotational speeds of the Earth and that the planet has been slowing down. His research spurred a remarkable increase in similar research studies and lead to discoveries in the changes of the orbital patterns of the Earth and moon over geologic time.