Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been."—Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo and do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

Charles Ward Hall (B.S., 1895) pioneered aluminum manufacturing procedures and tools in building aircraft. He developed the idea and tools to join duralumin – aircraft aluminum alloy skin – using cold-set rivets. This quickly revolutionized the manufacturing process and helped reduce drag.

Charles Frederick Hartt, Cornell’s first professor of geology, in the 1870s led two geological surveys of Brazil with Cornell geology students and faculty. He brought back geological and paleontological samples for the University’s burgeoning collections and botanical specimens for Wiegand Herbarium.

Prof. Jack Oliver's research provided convincing proof that Earth’s continents are constantly moving. In 1968, Dr. Oliver, colleague Dr. Bryan Isacks and a former graduate student Lynn Sykes, wrote the paper “Seismology and the New Global Tectonics,” that put together earthquake evidence from around the world that made a convincing case that continental drift was indeed occurring.

In 2006, the Fab@Home project, designed and produced by MAE students, was launched . This first fully open-source 3D printer in the U.S., helped launch the consumer 3D printing revolution. Within one year, the Fab@Home website received 17,000,000 hits and the project received a Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award.

Professor Julius Lucks’ research on RNA is discovering new truths about what RNA does and what it impacts, crucial in discovering potential shortcuts in engineering tailor-made biological pathways that could advance discoveries in human health and medicine.