Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

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Did you know?

The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico was designed by Engineering faculty member William E. Gordon. Built beginning in 1960, the observatory is the largest single-dish radar-radio telescope in the world and is home to numerous innovations including the discovery of the first exoplanets, creating a detailed map of the distribution of galaxies in the universe and mapping the surface of Venus.

First retractable landing gear for military planes was developed in 1932 by Leroy Grumman, (Mechanical Engineering, 1916). Designed at the request of the US Navy to replace hand-cranked landing gearing, it was first installed on the Grumman FF-1 biplane fighter.

William Jewell, professor emeritus in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, developed a nationally recognized initiative that employs animal manure in anarerobic digestion systems to produce electricity and heat on a farm.

F.C. Moon has made contributions to nonlinear and chaotic dynamics of mechanical systems. He was one of the first to develop experimental tools of analysis in nonlinear vibrations based on Poincare maps and fractal measures of chaos. His laboratory at Cornell, nicknamed the "Moon Lab" hosted nearly 100 research students and visitors during the period 1975-2000.

Professor Thomas O’Rourke (B.S. 1970), a specialist in the field of monitoring large construction projects, headed the team analyzing the impact of 9/11 attacks against New York City. The assessment found that the infrastructure of New York City survived the attack remarkably well, and led to creation of another team to determine the attributes of engineering that led to such resilience.