Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

CEE Professor Philip Li-Fan Liu pioneered the development of physically based mathematical models and efficient computational procedures that produce accurate predictions of wave fields over complex bathymetry as well as in the vicinity of coastal structures.

George Biddle Kelley (BS, Civil Engineering 1908), was one of the seven founders of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906, and Alpha chapter’s first President. At the start of the 20th century, black students at American universities were often excluded from fraternal organizations enjoyed by the predominantly white student population. During the 1905–06 school year, black students at Cornell organized the first Greek letter fraternity with the aim to provide an opportunity for association and mutual support among African-American students.

Ever heard of "Bill Nye the Science Guy"? He's a 1977 Cornell mechanical engineering graduate who often returns to campus for lectures and special events.

William Durand, a mechanical engineering professor from 1891 to 1904, was instrumental in forming the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1915, which was the forerunner of NASA. Durand helped to plan the committee’s first laboratory at Langley Field.

Dr. Lev Zetlin was responsible for numerous inventions, including pre-stressed concrete for airport runways, and the space-frame roof, which uses light-gauge metal to form grand open-space enclosures with minimal interior supports (used for the first hangars housing jumbo jets). His most well known project is the World's Fair New York State Pavilion, called the Tent of Tomorrow, which still stands today.