Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

In 2004, the first patients received the fully implantable artificial heart developed by David M. Lederman (Applied and Engineering Physics, B.S., 1966, M.S. 1967 Aerospace, Ph.D. 1973 Aerospace). At the time it was the most sophisticated device ever implanted in a human and paved the way for further development of completely self-contained artificial heart technology.

In 1975, OR students Edward Ignall and Warren Walker along with co-authors publish their paradigm-shifting paper, “Improving the Deployment of New York City Fire Companies”. Later awarded the INFORMS Lanchester Prize, it sets a new scope of directions for applications of OR in the public sector.

In 2014, Prof. Lynden Archer in 2014 was recognized for his outstanding contributions to the advancement of nanoscale science for his pioneering and sustained research on nanoparticle-polymer hybrid materials and their applications in electrochemical energy storage technologies.

George Biddle Kelley (BS, Civil Engineering 1908), was one of the seven founders of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906, and Alpha chapter’s first President. At the start of the 20th century, black students at American universities were often excluded from fraternal organizations enjoyed by the predominantly white student population. During the 1905–06 school year, black students at Cornell organized the first Greek letter fraternity with the aim to provide an opportunity for association and mutual support among African-American students.

Research by Frederick Bedell professor of applied electricity at Cornell from 1893-1952 led the first commercially produced oscilloscopes. He patented improvements including ability to stabilize the figures on the screen and show several curves simultaneously.