Admissions

Why Cornell Engineering?

"Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that never has been." Theodore von Karman

Cornell engineers challenge the status quo by breaking the rules to do great things. Steeped in an environment of questioning, and with a focus on innovation, Cornell Engineering pursues excellence in all areas. Its faculty, students, and alumni design, build, and test products, improve the world of medicine, inform and shape our laws, create and drive businesses, become research luminaries, and overcome real and perceived barriers to achieve scientific breakthroughs that advance the quality of life on our planet.

We invite you to learn more about Cornell Engineering and its programs.

What type of applicant are you?

Did you know?

“Animal-on-a-chip” research was developed by Biomedical Engineering department chair Michael Shuler and Daniel Tatosian (Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., 2006). The one-inch square chips contain liver cells, tumor cells, multidrug-resistant tumor cell, marrow cell and adipose tissue cells and represent mathematical models that predict mobility of drugs through various organs.

Prof. David Erickson developed a solar powered medical testing kit so people in remote, underserved areas of the world can have fast, accurate tests for certain cancers. He also developed smartphone-based systems for measuring personalized cholesterol and vitamin D levels in resource-poor areas of the world.

In 2009, Eureqa, a mathematical program that distills scientific laws from raw data, was developed and made freely available to researchers. Created by Cornell's Creative Machines Lab, the program was based on faculty member Hod Lipson’s work on robots that can independently repair themselves. The program evaluates a large amount of data in the search of mathematical formulas and relationships.

In 2008, Todd E. Humphreys, Paul Kintner and Mark Psiaki, and Brent Ledvina, demonstrated the first known GPS spoofing attack, where a hacker can fool a targeted GPS receiver to misestimating its position, time or both. This has guided the development of a new generation of spoofing detection countermeasures to ensure the security of civilian GPS.

Chris Prince (Ph.D., 1991) and Bobby Bringi (Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., 1991), formed Phyton Biotech that pioneered and commercialized a breakthrough plant-cell fermentation technology to produce the anti-cancer drug, Taxol, first extracted from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree.