Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

Professor Thomas O’Rourke (B.S. 1970), a specialist in the field of monitoring large construction projects, headed the team analyzing the impact of 9/11 attacks against New York City. The assessment found that the infrastructure of New York City survived the attack remarkably well, and led to creation of another team to determine the attributes of engineering that led to such resilience.

The electric organ (Hammond Organ) was invented in 1934 by Laurens Hammond (Mechanical Engineering, 1916). This inexpensive alternative to costly pipe organs found immediate popularity with churches, ball parks and ice rinks. Later, the instrument became the default choice for many keyboardists in rock, jazz and blues.

Daniel Peter Loucks, (Ph.D. '65 Civil Engineering) is known worldwide for his leadership in the application of systems analysis to the fields of water resources and environmental engineering.

Nora Stanton Blatch Barney graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering in 1905 as the first women to do so from any U.S. engineering school. The daughter and granddaughter of suffragists, her groundbreaking career included working for the NY Public Service Commission as an assistant engineer (1912-1913), and later for the Public Works Administration in CT and RI as architect, engineering inspector and structural-steel designer.

Salpeter-Decay-The technique for detecting radiologic decay in tagged molecules called quantitative electron-microscopic autoradiography was developed by Miriam Salpeter during her postdoctoral research in Applied and Engineering Physics in 1961 to 1967.