Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

John Sweet, one of the first professors to ever teach engineering courses at Cornell, in 1873 built the first micrometer caliper for making tools in the United States. He also invented a nail-making machine that made the hand production of nails obsolete.

In 1933 Ralph Mosser Barnes was awarded the first PhD worldwide in Industrial Engineering for his dissertation “Practical and Theoretical Aspects of Micromotion Study” . It was retooled into the 1937 text, Motion and Time: Design and Measurement in Work, that sold 300,000 copies:, forming a quantitative basis for analyzing the industrial production process, including such applications as movements required for typing and the commercial folding of napkins .

Kate Gleason, who in 1884 was the first woman admitted to study engineering at Cornell, was in 1918, the first woman elected to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. She also designed low-cost housing in Rochester using a concrete-pouring process that she invented.

Charles Frederick Hartt, Cornell’s first professor of geology, in the 1870s led two geological surveys of Brazil with Cornell geology students and faculty. He brought back geological and paleontological samples for the University’s burgeoning collections and botanical specimens for Wiegand Herbarium.

UltrOZ, a wearable therapeutic ultrasound system for horses, provides up to six hours of unsupervised ultrasound therapy to reduce inflammation and promote healing. The technology grew out of work done by Cornell alum, George K. Lewis, (BME, M.S. 2008, Ph.D., 2012) who co-founded the company.