Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

In 1933 Ralph Mosser Barnes was awarded the first PhD worldwide in Industrial Engineering for his dissertation “Practical and Theoretical Aspects of Micromotion Study” . It was retooled into the 1937 text, Motion and Time: Design and Measurement in Work, that sold 300,000 copies:, forming a quantitative basis for analyzing the industrial production process, including such applications as movements required for typing and the commercial folding of napkins .

The lab of Abe Stroock, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, developed synthetic blood vessels leading to new techniques in regenerative medicine and better drug delivery strategies.

Rick Johnson, Cornell professor of engineering, who holds a Ph.D. in engineering with a Ph.D. minor in art history, developed a process that can help verify paintings based on the weave pattern of the canvas. In 2013, his technique helped authenticate a long-lost Vincent van Gogh painting “Sunset at Montmajour.”

In 2014, Prof. Michael King and his team unveiled a new method for killing metastatic cancer cells directly in the bloodstream.  Almost 90 percent of all cancer deaths are caused by metastases and this new method could prove a valuable weapon in the fight against cancer.

“Animal-on-a-chip” research was developed by Biomedical Engineering department chair Michael Shuler and Daniel Tatosian (Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., 2006). The one-inch square chips contain liver cells, tumor cells, multidrug-resistant tumor cell, marrow cell and adipose tissue cells and represent mathematical models that predict mobility of drugs through various organs.