Linda Nozick

Research & Faculty

Cornell Engineering’s leadership in research is evident through its current roster of world-class faculty and researchers, as well as its many centers and facilities.  

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Are you, or your company/business, foundation, or non-profit agency interested in exploring a project or research with the College of Engineering? The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations can help bridge connections. Below is a link to a form that will assist our office in determining how to best serve your project or research goals and connect you to the right faculty and staff members to support your partnership objectives.

Research or Project Questions and Overview

More information about research and faculty

Did you know?

The late George David Low, (Mechanical Engineering, B.S., 1980), was an astronaut of three space flights, logging more than 714 hours in space, including nearly six hours on a spacewalk. On his first flight into space, an 11-day mission aboard the space shuttle Columbia, Low carried with him a pair of 159-year-old socks that had belonged to Ezra Cornell.

In 2004, the first patients received the fully implantable artificial heart developed by David M. Lederman (Applied and Engineering Physics, B.S., 1966, M.S. 1967 Aerospace, Ph.D. 1973 Aerospace). At the time it was the most sophisticated device ever implanted in a human and paved the way for further development of completely self-contained artificial heart technology.

In 1974, Prof. Jack Blakely and his MSE students were first in the world to synthesize a single layer of graphene (a very thin, nearly transparent sheet, one atom thick) and determine its structure. Their method is the same used today by industries to make meter-sized sheets of graphene.

Art Ruoff, professor and founding faculty member of MSE, was first researcher in 1990 reaching a static pressure of 416 GPa, the first scientist to create a static pressure greater than at the center of the earth, 361 GPa. This research has been used to study the properties of materials and show that oxygen, sulphur and noble gases like xenon become metals under enormous pressure.

In 1965, MSE faculty, Ulrich Bonse and Michael Hart, made x-ray interferometry possible. This pioneering work made it feasible to see smaller details in an x-ray and is used in a wide range of biological and medical studies.